Sonnet 130 poem analysis. My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun (Sonnet 130) by William Shakespeare 2019-03-04

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A Short Analysis of Shakespeare’s Sonnet 130: ‘My mistress’ eyes are nothing like the sun’

sonnet 130 poem analysis

The smell of the mistress is described in line seven and eight, where it is said that some perfumes smell much better than she does. This is followed in line 2, above with a common metrical variation, the initial reversal. Remember familiarity often breeds love , we love our old furniture , the nondescript tree in our garden , our faithful old dog etc. Features Google Custom Search This is feature allows you to search the site. Some say that in Shakespeare's time the word reeks meant to emanate or rise, like smoke. In Shakespeare's time the ideal woman was white, slender, blonde haired, red-lipped, bright-eyed and had silky smooth white skin.

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Analysis of Sonnet 130 by William Shakespeare

sonnet 130 poem analysis

In the end the speaker argues that his may lover may not be perfect, but in his eyes her beauty is equal… How does the poet present love? The dark lady, who ultimately betrays the poet, appears in sonnets 127 to 154. The Art of Shakespeare's Sonnets. Ammetto di non aver mai visto camminare una dea, ma la mia donna camminando calca la terra. In Sonnet 130, Shakespeare redefined what love poems were, by making his poem a parody of the conventional love poems that were written by poets in the sixteenth to seventeenth century. The Shakespearean Moment and its Place in the Poetry of the 17th Century.

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Analysis of Shakespeare's Sonnet 130

sonnet 130 poem analysis

But Shakespeare ends the sonnet by proclaiming his love for his mistress despite her lack of adornment, so he does finally embrace the fundamental theme in Petrarch's sonnets: total and consuming love. This woman's lips must be very bland, indeed! Remarketing Pixels We may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites. An initial reversal is potentially present in line 8, and mid-line reversals occur in lines 4 and 12, and potentially in line 3. But in the end, the writer still loves her. So, his loved one cannot be compare to a goddess because she walks on the solid ground.

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Analysis and Interpretation of William Shakespeare’s “Sonnet 130”

sonnet 130 poem analysis

Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so. William Shakespeare wrote this poem although it was unusual for a man to see a woman as a multidimensional character. William Shakespeare is an example of a poet and writer of this time period, and possible one of the most recognised for his work. I'm Cluivee, and I'm interested in all things Shakespeare! He believes his relationship with this woman is better because it is based on honesty. In comparison, they all instigate the traditional theme of love where women were admired and sometimes worshipped in order to express deep love that emissaries her beauty. The poet, openly contemptuous of his weakness for the woman, expresses his infatuation for her in negative comparisons. After reading this sonnet the reader finds other love poems superficial and thinks that it is shocking how women were reduced on their appearance.

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My mistress eyes are nothing like the sun (Sonnet 130) by William Shakespeare

sonnet 130 poem analysis

Lesson Summary It is refreshing to read Sonnet 130 because it avoids the unrealistic, syrupy sentiments that may be found in many other sonnets. Written from a first person perspective, I and My occur 11 times. In lines 6 and 7 the natural order of the words is inversed, a technique known as anastrophe. Lines one and three sun and dun , lines two and four red and head , lines five and seven white and delight , lines six and eight cheeks and reeks , lines nine and eleven know and go , lines ten and twelve sound and ground , and lines thirteen and fourteen rare and compare each rhyme with one another Caws 1141. The poetic speaker, rather than elevate her, brings her further down to earth.


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Sonnet 130

sonnet 130 poem analysis

There is no pinkish blush on her cheeks. Google Hosted Libraries Javascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis. Written sometime in the mid-1590s, it was published, along with the rest of his sonnets, in 1609. Sonnet 130 contains several literary devices that enhance the texture of the sound and reinforce certain tropes. However, its is indeed a satire in nature and there are clever facets to this poem. The York and Lancaster rose is red and white streaked, symbolic of the union of the Red Rose of Lancaster and the White Rose of York.

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“Trout” and “Sonnet 130”: A Comparison of Two Poems Essay

sonnet 130 poem analysis

This is true love which overcomes the decay of age and the test of time. In Sonnet 130, the speaker describes the woman that he loves in extremely unflattering terms but claims that he truly loves her, which lends credibility to his claim because even though he does not find her attractive, he still declares his love for her. In writing this poem, he was gently poking fun at the conventional romantic poems that were being written by other poets. I love to hear her speak, yet well I know That music hath a far more pleasing sound; I grant I never saw a goddess go; My mistress when she walks treads on the ground. The rhyme scheme in the quatrains is a cross rhyme abab cdcd efef and the last two lines are a rhyming couplet gg. Sovrn This is an ad network.


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Shakespeare's Sonnet 130: Summary, Tone & Literary Devices

sonnet 130 poem analysis

But mark to Heaven mine love's industry,. Why is he saying it? So little record of his private life exists that most of what people know about Shakespeare stems from scholarly discussion and speculation, rather than actual records or facts. In this sonnet, Shakespeare exaggerates to make a point. Other product and company names shown may be trademarks of their respective owners. If the classic, lovely and fragrant English Rose is absent, at least this mistress has no pretence to a sweet smelling breath. This sonnet compares the poet's mistress to a number of natural beauties; each time making a point of his mistress' obvious inadequacy in such comparisons; she cannot hope to stand up to the beauties of the natural world. Instead of comparing his love to something she is, he is comparing his love to something she is not: his love is not like the sun; her lips are not even as orange as coral; her cheeks are not like a rose.

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Poetic Devices Used in Shakespeare's Sonnet 130

sonnet 130 poem analysis

Her eyes do not shine, her lips are not red, her breasts are not white, her cheeks are pale, her breath stinks, she does not have a pleasant voice, and she does walk gracefully as a goddess would. But he points out that his love does not depend on how she looks like. Do we think that by merely rejecting such hyperbole, Shakespeare is doing down his mistress? One of two styles of sonnet is Elizabethan. HubPages ® is a registered Service Mark of HubPages, Inc. In lines three and four the anatomy of the mistress is further explored in unorthodox fashion. In line 13, Shakespeare states that he thinks his love is rare. Roses are also a sign for love and passion, so again the mistress is questioned in fulfilling her role as a woman who is supposed to please a man.

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